• Lorna Brown

    Lorna Brown is Associate Director/Curator at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia and a visual artist, writer, educator and editor, exhibiting her work internationally since 1984. Brown was the Director/Curator of Artspeak Gallery from 1999 to 2004 and is a founding member of Other Sights for Artists’ Projects, a collective of artists, architects and curators presenting projects that consider the varying conditions of public places and public life. She has taught at Emily Carr University of Art and Design and Simon Fraser University. Brown received an honorary degree from Emily Carr University of Art and Design (2015), the Vancouver Institute for the Visual Arts Award (1996) and the Canada Council Paris Studio Award (2000). Her work is in the collections of the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, the National Gallery of Canada, the BC Arts Council, the Surrey Art Gallery and the Canada Council Art Bank.

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  • Lisa Darms

    Lisa Darms is Interim Director, Hauser & Wirth Institute, New York, writer and archivist who works closely with artists’ archives. As Senior Archivist at NYU’s Fales Library & Special Collections from 2009 to 2016, she managed the renowned collection of artists’ and art organizations’ archives, and was founder and curator of the Fales Riot Grrrl Collection. Darms holds an MFA in photography, MA in history and archival management and a Certificate in Appraisal Studies in Fine and Decorative Arts. Darms has presented and written widely on contemporary art and artists’ archives. Her book The Riot Grrrl Collection (2013) was published by the Feminist Press and Weight of the Earth: The Tape Journals of David Wojnarocwicz (2018) by Semiotext(e).

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  • Kate Hennessy

    As an anthropologist of media and the director of the Making Culture Lab at Simon Fraser University’s School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT), Kate Hennessy’s research explores the impacts of new memory infrastructures and cultural practices of media, museums, and archives in the context of technoscience. Her multimedia and artworks investigate documentary methodologies to address Indigenous and settler histories of place and space. Hennessy is a founding member of the Ethnographic Terminalia Collective, which has curated exhibitions and projects at the intersection of anthropology and contemporary art since 2009. In 2017, she was awarded the Confederation of University Faculty Associations of BC’s Early in Career Award, which recognizes the contributions to the non-academic community made by faculty members who are at an early point in their careers.

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  • Sarah Hunt

    Sarah Hunt is Assistant Professor of Critical Indigenous Geographies in the Department of Geography at the University of British Columbia. She is Kwagiulth (Kwakwaka’wakw) from Tsaxis, and has spent most of her life as a guest in Lkwungen territories. Hunt’s scholarship in Indigenous and legal geographies critically takes up questions of justice, gender, self-determination and the spatiality of Indigenous law. Her writing and research emerge within the networks of community relations that have fostered her analysis as a community-based researcher, with a particular focus on issues facing women, girls and Two-Spirit people. Hunt received her BA and MA from the University of Victoria and her PhD from Simon Fraser University. Her writing has been published in numerous books and scholarly journals, as well as in popular media outlets. Hunt is co-editor of ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies.

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  • Yaniya Lee

    Yaniya Lee is a Toronto-based writer and scholar and Associate Editor at Canadian Art magazine. Her interdisciplinary research draws on Black studies to question critical-reading practices and reconsider Canadian art histories. She has an interest in community organizing and collective practice. Lee is a founding collective member of MICE Magazine and member of the EMILIA-AMALIA working group. She was previously on the editorial advisory committees for C Magazine and FUSE. Her writing has appeared in the FADERNOW MagazineC MagazineMagenta Magazine and Adult. She has two chapbooks: Troubled (2014) and In Different Situations Different Behaviour will Produce Different Results (2013). Lee has also written exhibition texts for Walter Scott and Laurie Kang, and about the artistic practices of Tau Lewis, Divya Mehra and Hannah Black. From 2012 to 2015, Lee hosted Art Talks MTL, a series of long-form interviews with Montreal art workers. In 2016, she programmed “Labour, Land, and Body: geographies of de/colonialism” for Vtape’s Curatorial Incubator.

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  • Jacqueline Mabey

    Jacqueline Mabey’s work is shaped by studies at Wilfrid Laurier University, McGill University and the University of British Columbia, and by multifarious professional experience in commercial galleries, museums and artist studios. Mabey works in a research-based curatorial model, exploring a set of recurrent themes: desire, power, visibility, vulnerability and creative community. They create texts and contexts for the analysis and presentation of contemporary art in a spirit of rigorous openness, as an invitation to the reader or viewer to actively participate in the process of making meaning. Mabey is a co-founder of Art+Feminism, an international, activist curatorial platform based out of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, with satellites in galleries and museums internationally. Mabey is Assistant Curator at Paul Robeson Galleries, Rutgers University – Newark and works independently under the honorific failed projects. They were born in the land of the Lenape, raised in Miꞌkmaꞌki (specifically, Nova Scotia), and later returned to Lenapehoking.

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  • Cait McKinney

    Cait McKinney is Assistant Professor in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University, specializing in sexuality studies, media history, feminist media studies and activist media. McKinney’s research examines the politics of information in queer social movements, focusing on how these movements struggle to provide vital access to information using new digital tools, within conditions where that access is often precarious. This work considers how queer and feminist social justice initiatives offer novel approaches to issues of accessibility, data-management and participation in networked media environments. Their current research focuses on HIV/AIDS and digital media, and queer activist responses to early online content regulation. McKinney was previously a Media@McGill Postdoctoral Fellow at McGill University and a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information. McKinney’s research has appeared in GLQ, Continuum: Journal of Media and Culture, Radical History Review and Feminist Theory, amongst other publications. They are the co-editor of Inside Killjoy’s Kastle: Dykey Ghosts, Feminist Monsters, and Other Lesbian Hauntings (UBC Press and AGYU Press, 2019).

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  • Allyson Mitchell

    Allyson Mitchell is a maximalist artist working in sculpture, performance, installation and film. This has resulted in (to name a few) a coven of lesbian feminist Sasquatch monsters, a fat activist performance group called Pretty Porky and Pissed off, a room-sized Vagina Dentata and a Lesbian Feminist Haunted House. She is based in the area known as Toronto within the territory subject to the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant and the treaty currently held by the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation. This area has been care taken by the Anishinabek Nation, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, the Huron-Wendat, and the Métis. Toronto is where she runs FAG Feminist Art Gallery with Deirdre Logue and, in her spare time, works as an  Associate Professor in the School of Women, Sexuality and Gender Studies at York University.

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  • Lisa Robertson

    Lisa Robertson is a poet and essayist from Toronto who currently lives and works in France. She has published several poetry books, essays and reviews and has been a visiting poet, lecturer and artist-in-residence at various institutions. Robertson’s poetry is known for its subversive engagement with the classical traditions of Western poetry and philosophy. Her subject matter is varied, framing poetic genres and philosophy with concepts of gender and nation, nature and womanhood and utopian impulses, as well as art, architecture, food and astrology. In the mid-1980s, Robertson studied at Simon Fraser University and became involved with the Kootenay School of Writing, a Vancouver-based writing collective, before running Proprioception Books (1988-94). Robertson has taught at the University of California San Diego, Capilano College, Dartington College of Art, the California College of Art and the University of Cambridge. Robertson continues to be one of Canada’s most celebrated and internationally recognized poets.

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  • Shelly Rosenblum

    Shelly Rosenblum is Curator of Academic Programs at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Inaugurating this position at the Belkin, Shelly’s role is to develop programs that increase myriad forms of civic and academic engagement in the University, the wider Vancouver community and beyond. Shelly received her PhD at Brown University and has taught at Brown, Wesleyan and UBC. Her awards include Fellowships from the Center for the Humanities, Wesleyan University and a multi-year Presidential Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Department of English, UBC. She was selected for the Summer Leadership Institute of the Association of Academic Museums and Galleries at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University (2014). Her research interests include issues in contemporary art and museum theory, discourses of the Black Atlantic, critical theory, narrative and performativity. Her teaching covers the 17th to the 21st centuries. She remains very active in professional associations related to academic museums and cultural studies, attending international conferences and workshops, and recently completing two terms (six years) on the Board of Directors at the Western Front, Vancouver, including serving as Board President. At UBC Shelly is an Affiliate of the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies.

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  • Denise Ryner

    Denise Ryner is Director/Curator at Or Gallery, Vancouver and a writer and educator who has been based in Toronto, Vancouver and Berlin. She has worked in commercial, public and artist-run galleries in Toronto and Vancouver for over ten years including Art Metropole, Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, the Vancouver Art Gallery and recently SFU Galleries where she developed a series of public projects such as Art + City + School, Rain or Shine Saturdays and Projections at the Perel. Ryner completed her BA and MA in art history at the University of Toronto and the University of British Columbia respectively. Ryner has also worked as an independent curator, writer and educator presenting exhibitions, screenings and talks at the Jackman Humanities Institute, Canadian Heritage’s Toronto regional office, VIVO Media Arts Centre, Roundhouse Community Arts Centre, the Contemporary Art Gallery (CAG) Vancouver, 8eleven Project Space, and has taught studies in curatorial practice at Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

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  • Erin Silver

    Erin Silver is a historian of queer and feminist art, visual culture, performance and activism. She is Assistant Professor in the Art History, Visual Art and Theory Department and Faculty Associate at the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia. Silver obtained a PhD in art history and gender and women’s studies from McGill University in 2013, and has taught at the University of Southern California, the University of Guelph, the University of Toronto, OCAD University and Concordia University. She is the co-editor (with Amelia Jones) of Otherwise: Imagining Queer Feminist Art Histories (Manchester University Press, 2016), co-editor (with taisha paggett) of the winter 2017 issue of C Magazine, “Force,” on intersectional feminisms and movement culture and author of the forthcoming Suzy Lake: Life & Work (Art Canada Institute, 2020). She has curated exhibitions at the FOFA Gallery (Concordia University, Montreal), the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives (Toronto), and the Doris McCarthy Gallery (University of Toronto Scarborough). Silver’s writing has appeared in numerous journals, as well as in various exhibition catalogues in the areas of Canadian photography and queer and feminist art. She is an editor of RACAR (Revue d’art canadienne / Canadian Art Review) and sits on the editorial advisory committee of C Magazine.

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  • Thea Quiray Tagle

    Thea Quiray Tagle is a scholar, teacher and writer based in Seattle, WA. Her ongoing research investigates urban renewal and gentrification, socially engaged art and site-specific performance, and grassroots movements in the SF Bay Area. She is a faculty member at the University of Washington Bothell, and has previously taught at San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco State University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and UC San Diego. Tagle received her PhD in Ethnic Studies from the University of California, San Diego and a BA from Barnard College, Columbia University. Her research has been published in academic journals including Critical Ethnic Studies, ACME: An International Journal for Critical Geographies, and Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas. As a practitioner, Tagle has curated exhibitions and performances for Seattle University’s Vachon Gallery, The Alice (Seattle) and Feast Arts Center (Tacoma, WA), and has organized public programs for venues including the Asian Art Museum (San Francisco), Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and Centro Cultural de la Raza (San Diego).

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