• Alison Ariss

    Alison Ariss is a PhD student in AHVA at UBC. She earned her art history MA at UBC, and holds a BA Honours in anthropology from Waterloo. As a settler-scholar, Ariss finds her research is an (un)learning experience that centers Salish weaving practices, and is guided by Indigenous feminist approaches and critiques of institutions. Prior to her return to graduate studies in 2015, Ariss worked in research development, including pre-award administration and management roles at the University of Winnipeg and McMaster, to consultative roles for research partnerships with Western and UBC. She has experience with funders such as the Social Science and Humanities Research Council, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, and the Networks of Centres of Excellence, and was engaged with knowledge mobilization projects. Ariss has volunteered with public interest research organizations, community groups and museums as a volunteer board member, program developer and curatorial assistant.

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  • Lorna Brown

    Lorna Brown is Associate Director/Curator at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia and a visual artist, writer, educator and editor, exhibiting her work internationally since 1984. Brown was the Director/Curator of Artspeak Gallery from 1999 to 2004 and is a founding member of Other Sights for Artists’ Projects, a collective of artists, architects and curators presenting projects that consider the varying conditions of public places and public life. She has taught at Emily Carr University of Art and Design and Simon Fraser University. Brown received an honorary degree from Emily Carr University of Art and Design (2015), the Vancouver Institute for the Visual Arts Award (1996) and the Canada Council Paris Studio Award (2000). Her work is in the collections of the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, the National Gallery of Canada, the BC Arts Council, the Surrey Art Gallery and the Canada Council Art Bank.

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  • T. Patrick Carrabré

    T. Patrick Carrabré has been active as a composer, administrator, educator, radio host and conductor. For well over a decade, he worked closely with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, including six seasons as composer-in-residence and co-curator of the orchestra’s New Music Festival. Also active in the media, Carrabré served two seasons as the weekend host of CBC Radio 2’s contemporary music show The Signal.

    Commissioners have included pianists Janina Fialkowska, Megumi Masaki and Alexander Tselyakov, the Gryphon Trio, the Winnipeg Singers, the Ottawa Chamber Music Festival, the Winnipeg Chamber Music Society, cellists Caroline Stinson and Shauna Rolston, as well as the Manitoba Chamber Orchestra and the Eckhardt-Gramatté National Music Competition. Carrabré’s best known compositions include Inuit Games, for throat singers (katajjak) and orchestra, Sonata No. 1, The Penitent, for violin and piano, From the Dark Reaches, and A Hammer For Your Thoughts…. Together these works have earned two Juno nominations, a recommendation at the International Rostrum of Composers (2003), a Western Canadian Music Award (Best Classical Composition) and two other WCMA nominations.

    Carrabré’s primary focus as an artist-researcher is in the area of research-creation, and he has been involved with community-engaged research. Construction of identity is a long-term theme, manifesting in his compositions, concert and radio programming, and administrative activities. The creation of shared musical spaces with indigenous and non-western musicians has also been a significant theme of his work and since the dawn of the Truth and Reconciliation era, this has led to a number of works confronting issues of decolonization, frequently using deconstructionist techniques. Carrabré’s other interests have included the exploration of his Métis heritage, use of interactive electronics, and editorial work.

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  • Barbara Cole

    Barbara Cole is the founder and principal of Cole Projects. She is an artist, curator, educator and curatorial consultant in public art. In recent years, she has specialized in developing frameworks to support changing programs of public art that require the cooperation of multiple partners. She is the founder and a producing member of Other Sights for Artists’ Projects, a non-profit society that collaborates and shares resources to present artworks that consider the aesthetic, economic and regulatory conditions of public places and public life. Cole has led workshops, lectured widely and published articles on the subject of art in public space. She taught at Emily Carr University from 1984 to 1999 and worked as a consultant to the City of Vancouver’s Public Art Program from 1999 to 2004. Throughout her career, she has been actively involved in the Vancouver art community, serving on gallery and art society boards and has participated as a jury member for numerous art initiatives. In 2011 Cole received the Mayor’s Award for her contributions to the advancement of public art in Vancouver and in 2013, was a curatorial resident at ZK/U Center for Art and Urbanistics in Berlin, Germany.

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  • Candice Hopkins

    Candice Hopkins is a curator and writer of Tlingit descent originally from Whitehorse, Yukon. She is Senior Curator of the Toronto Biennial of Art and co-curator of the 2018 SITE Santa Fe biennial, Casa Tomada. She was a part of the curatorial team for documenta 14 in Athens, Greece and Kassel, Germany and a co-curator of the major exhibitions Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art, Close Encounters: The Next 500 Years, and the 2014 SITElines biennial, Unsettled Landscapes in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her writing is published widely and her recent essays and presentations include “Outlawed Social Life” for South as a State of Mind and Sounding the Margins: A Choir of Minor Voices at Small Projects, Tromsø, Norway. She has lectures internationally including at the Witte de With, Tate Modern, Dak’Art Biennale, Artists Space, Tate Britain and the University of British Columbia. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the Hnatyshyn Foundation Award for Curatorial Excellence in Contemporary Art and the 2016 the Prix pour un essai critique sur l’art contemporain by the Foundation Prince Pierre de Monaco. She is a citizen of Carcross/Tagish First Nation.

     

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  • Sasha Kow

    Sasha Kow is a Malaysian composer currently based on the unceded, territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil- Waututh peoples. She obtained a BMus in Composition from the University of Oregon, and is now in the 2nd year of her graduate degree in Composition at the University of British Columbia. Her music has been performed at the Concerts at First series, Oregon Bach Festival, Oregon Composers Forum, and the Music Today Festival. Her most recent work was premiered at the West Coast Student Composers’ Symposium by UBC’s Contemporary Players. Her art strives to understand where and how her background and upbringing fit into the world of Western contemporary art music. Through her involvement with the Score Cluster Research, she seeks to diversify her approach to writing music and hearing sound.

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  • David Metzer

    David Metzer is a historian of twentieth and twenty-first century music. His work covers a variety of genres, including popular music, classical, and jazz. He nimbly jumps from Barry Manilow’s power ballads to songs by Aaron Copland. His research explores cultural issues of race, sexuality, gender, and emotional expression. A new project looks at how musicians have confronted the toll of incarceration in American society and how musical works have shaped understandings of incarceration.

    He is the author of The Ballad in American Popular Music: From Elvis to BeyoncéMusical Modernism at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century, and Quotation and Cultural Meaning in Twentieth-Century Music.  The Ballad in American Popular Music: From Elvis to Beyoncé is the first history of the ballad in recent popular music and discusses why these songs have become emotional touchstones in our lives and American society. David has published articles in a wide range of music and interdisciplinary journals, including Journal of the American Musicological SocietyPopular MusicModernism/modernity, and Black Music Research Journal.

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  • Jay Pahre

    Jay Pahre (American, b. 1991) is a queer and trans settler artist, writer, and cultural worker currently based on the unceded territories of the of Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh peoples. Weaving between drawing, sculpture and writing, his work queries trans and queer nonhuman ecologies at points of intersection with the human. He received his BFA in Painting and BA in East Asian Studies from the University of Illinois in 2014, and went on to complete his MA in East Asian Studies in 2017. His work has been exhibited across the US and Canada. He has received multiple teaching awards alongside research and community-activism recognition for the support and advocacy work he has done for and with LGBTQ2S+ communities since 2009. For Pahre’s online project, visit https://belkin.ubc.ca/jay-pahre/

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  • Marcus Prasad

    Marcus Prasad is an art historian and writer currently residing on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh peoples. He has earned his MA (2020) and BA Honours (2018) in Art History and Theory from the University of British Columbia, with a research focus on spatial theory, temporality, and queer theory as they relate to American contemporary horror film and postwar art. His work has been funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and he has been the recipient of the Patsy and David Heffel Award in Art History, the Ian Wallace Award in Art History, and the University of Toronto Master Essay Prize. Prasad is the current Editor-in-Chief at SAD Magazine, an arts and culture print publication seeking to feature emerging artists and writers, and has served as Secretary on the Board of Directors at Richmond Art Gallery (2015-2020) and Access Gallery (2019-present). His work has appeared in Cinephile and CineAction, and his research presented at McGill University, The University of Victoria, Ontario College of Art and Design, and Carleton University.

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  • Dylan Robinson

    Dylan Robinson is a xwélméxw artist and writer of Stó:lō descent, and the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Arts at Queen’s University. His current work focuses on the return of Indigenous songs to communities who were prohibited by law to sing them as part of the Indian Act from 1882‒1951. Robinson’s previous publications include the edited volumes Music and Modernity Among Indigenous Peoples of North America (2018); Arts of Engagement: Taking Aesthetic Action in and Beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (2016) and Opera Indigene (2011). His monograph, Hungry Listening, is forthcoming in early 2020 with Minnesota University Press.

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  • Shelly Rosenblum

    Shelly Rosenblum is Curator of Academic Programs at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Inaugurating this position at the Belkin, Shelly’s role is to develop programs that increase myriad forms of civic and academic engagement in the University, the wider Vancouver community and beyond. Shelly received her PhD at Brown University and has taught at Brown, Wesleyan and UBC. Her awards include Fellowships from the Center for the Humanities, Wesleyan University and a multi-year Presidential Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Department of English, UBC. She was selected for the Summer Leadership Institute of the Association of Academic Museums and Galleries at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University (2014). Her research interests include issues in contemporary art and museum theory, discourses of the Black Atlantic, critical theory, narrative and performativity. Her teaching covers the 17th to the 21st centuries. She remains very active in professional associations related to academic museums and cultural studies, attending international conferences and workshops, and recently completing two terms (six years) on the Board of Directors at the Western Front, Vancouver, including serving as Board President. At UBC Shelly is an Affiliate of the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies.

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  • Naomi Sawada

    Naomi Sawada is Manager of Public Programs at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at the University of British Columbia (UBC). She received a BA (Anthropology 1995) and Diploma (Art History 1996) from UBC. She has worked in exhibitions research and programs at Science World in Vancouver (1986-1991) and at the UBC Museum of Anthropology (1991-1995). As co-curator of exhibitions and curator of programs, she helped to develop the mandate and operating policies at the Nikkei National Museum in Burnaby (1995-2000). With John O’Brian and Scott Watson, she co-edited All Amazed: for Roy Kiyooka(Vancouver: Arsenal Pulp Press, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, and the Vancouver Art Forum Society, 2002), and with Scott Watson and Jana Tyner, co-edited Thrown: British Columbia’s Apprentices of Bernard Leach and Their Contemporaries (Vancouver: Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, 2011). Two of her abiding interests are to include discussions about diversity and anti-racism in her programs and to mentor university students; many have become curators and programmers in cultural organizations. She served on the Board of Directors of 221A and currently serves on the Boards of the Asian Canadian Studies Society and the North West Ceramics Foundation.

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